It’s Official: Researchers Have Discovered A Second Earth


Researchers have confirmed the existence of a SECOND Earth located in the Proxima Centauri System. The planet is believed to have oceans just like Earth and may hay host alien life.
In the past, thousands of exoplanets have been discovered in the universe, but none of them is like Proxima B.

Proxima b, as has been baptized, has very ‘promising characteristics’: it is probably rocky, slightly more massive than our own planet and is located in the region around its star that would allow liquid water on its surface to exist.

 

Researchers have discovered a planet located in the Proxima Centauri system, one of the closest stars to Earth which they believe harbors liquid water and potentially alien life.
The planet, named Proxima B is believed to be around 1.3 times the size of our planet and has the ideal temperature on the surface for water in a liquid state to exist.

Proxima B is located four light years away from Earth –over 25 TRILLION MILES—meaning that in order to visit the planet in the near future, future generation would have to come up with super-fast spacecraft that would allow them to travel to the Proxima Centauri system with ease.

If the planet proves to be ‘a SECOND Earth’ it could become one of the best options for future human colonization.

Researchers believe that the temperature on the surface of the planet could be between -90 degrees Celsius and 30 degrees Celsius.

 

According to researchers, Proxima B may be the best opportunity we have come across to find DIRECT evidence of the existence of Alien Lifeforms outside of out solar system.

The planet which has already been dubbed ‘a second Earth’ is located at an ideal distance from its host star for liquid water to exist, which means that life as we know it is very likely to exist.

Proxima B is the closest exoplanet we have ever discovered, and according to researchers, a mission to the planet to search for signs of life could be something achievable within our lifetime.

 

The distance from our planet to Proxima B may seem insurmountable, but it is actually formidably shorter when compared to other candidates to host life. This means that Proxima B could become the first objective for future interstellar travel.
Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf located in the constellation Centaurus. The star itself is too weak to be observed with the naked eye, but in recent months, scientists have not taken their eyes off of it.
In fact, during the first half of this year, Proxima Centauri was followed regularly with the HARPS spectrograph installed on the 3.6-meter telescope of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in La Silla (Chile) and monitored simultaneously with other instruments from around the world.

 

“Many exoplanets have been found, and many more will be found, but searching for the closest potential Earth-analogue and succeeding has been the experience of a lifetime for all of us,” Dr. Guillem Anglada-Escudé, lead author of the paper, said.“Many people’s stories and efforts have converged on this discovery. The result is also a tribute to all of them. The search for life on Proxima b comes next.”

There are already two papers which describe and go through the potential habitability of Proxima B.

Future observations, for example using the 39-m ESO E-ELT telescope under construction in Chile, will allow further investigation of Proxima b and of the hypothetical presence of a thick atmosphere and a liquid water reservoir. If this turned out to be the case, it would be very exciting that the nearest star to the Sun also hosts the nearest habitable (perhaps inhabited?) planet.

Comments

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Earth is the best planet so far in the universe we have to preserve this but hey if there is another one out there we need to work harder to be able to travel that far!

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  3. Humanity needs to develop faster than light travel. There's been a Warp drive theorized by a man named Acculbierre. A starship that projects a Warp bubble around itself using negative energy & moves using the inflationary principle where the space around the ship is what is actually moving. Theoretically it could move many times the speed of light without effecting the ships mass. To have a truly galactic civilization we will need FTL stardrives.

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    1. Well we haven't even figured out yet how to get to the speed of light. So FTL might take a while.

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    2. It is possible propulsion could get us close enough to light speed to make the trip in 5-6 years, the problem being how quickly you could accelerate and decelerate.
      Going at or above light speed in normal space is a theoretical impossibility.

      Hopefully we can eventually get back some budget for research, especially at the rate we are destroying our own planet.

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    3. Nothihg goes faster than light. Not even a large
      portion of it.

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    4. that type of FTL travel is called "warp" for a reason... nothing goes faster than light, so the warp "bubble" contracts space in front of it and expands space behind it... instead of literally exceeding the speed of light, you shrink the distance you have to go... lots of issues with that theory too, maybe also impossible, but it's probably more conceivable than actually exceeding light speed

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    5. Wouldn't it be 4-5 light years for observers not traveling? That would mean you could travel many light years in a "lifetime".

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    6. The problem here is that you have to generate a gravity field heavy enough to warp local spacetime to come up with an alcubierre drive. Meaning you're having to come up with something like an artificial singularity or some hyperdense material that, element-wise isn't going to last very long, atomically before it half-lifes into something else. Also, you've got to have it be portable in a way that it doesn't kill you with radiation, spaghetti-fy you, but can still be in the other room of your spacecraft and be usable as your FTL/Tesseracting drive. Have a look at Warren Ellis' 'ORBITER' if you'd like a bit of a primer on the whole alcubierre drive deal.

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  4. Please link your source material. Some of us would like to read trough the scientific articles.

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  5. The clickbaitiest headline of the year goes to...

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  6. How do we know the planet isn't already inhabited with people that wouldn't want us there??

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    1. Then we take it from them Columbus-style. Happy Columbus day?

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    2. Well we don't know that. But it is unlikely.

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    3. Look, white people know exactly what to do if there are people there. In America before the fork tongue came, we had millions of Native Americans that were here. Well, now they are not to be quite honest. Can do the same thing on Proxima B, especially if they are black.

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    4. Well, Negrodeus, if you would look a little deeper into history, you would find that those "Native Americans" also came here from somewhere else. They didn't just sprout up magically from this continent. Also, they were taking each other's territories long before whitey got here. The white man was just better at it. While you're at it, you might want to look up the origins of slavery. Whitey didn't start that either. Not saying any of it was right - just stating facts. So before you just get mad at what I'm saying, look it up.

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    5. Kecky, facts indeed. But, you're over simplifying it. True Native Americans also migrated from Africa, but it was UNINHABITED when they arrived. True they were warring before the arrival of Europeans, but there was no native MANIFEST DESTINY where entire continents and countries were forcefully stolen. True that Europeans didn't invent slavery, but the institutionalization and continent-wide economies were never done by natives. Natives took slaves, but only as a result of war or conflict; and, never by the millions! I don't think anyone would be 'mad' at you stating facts... but when you say the white man was "better at it" really makes you seem bigoted and draw away from you purely factual standpoint. One more thing,... space is awesome!

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    6. Dear "Unknown" thank you for your wise response to ignorance.

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    7. First, we don't know if there is sentient life. Second, if there is one, we don't know if there are people. Could be octopus for all we know. Or a form that is unimaginable on Earth. Third, we still live in a Darwinian world. We need to care for the homo sapience survival. Sometimes it means that someone else might not survive.

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  7. This is old news and the teams that discovered these objects were far less effusive about in their assessment about what it may mean for humanity. This presentation has a destinct tabloid feel to it.

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  8. We can't even figure out how to get back to the moon! We can't travel 1% of the speed of light! In a couple hundred years or so, let's say we get to 10% the speed of light. That would be 40 years to get there.

    So basically we are mapping the near universe for hopeful use in 500 years or so. Gotta start somewhere!

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  9. I'm quite sure that model isn't to scale. The heliosphere and terminal shock boundaries are FAAAAR beyond Pluto.

    The sun is a strong SOB.

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  10. Should. There be life beyond Earth should not the American populace. Have ample firearms on hand to maintain .The red Dawn option

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  11. Humans could colonize it, but what about the life that is there now???????

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  12. Our species hasn't even managed to agree about whether or not women are fully human. What makes us believe that we are entitled to colonize another planet that may already be fully populated by intelligent beings?

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  13. We can't even take of the one we live in now!!!

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    1. Hell, we can’t write sensical sentences.

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  14. Its going to be a long time before we know how to even leave our solar system yet travel interstellar space to a new solar system. My paradox says there is and have been billions of solar systems with intelligent life but only 2% of them ever make it out of their system. I say intelligence is a disease. With what we are doing to our own planet and playing God with places like CERN, and atomic energy in any form is intelligence figuring out how to destroy life on their planets, and only an accident they actually some how get out of their solar system prior to total destruction. So intelligence is a disease, I say.

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  15. We would have to start now building a generational ship to traverse the vast distance. Then of course the logistics of such a journey. Supplies for the original crew would be exhausted long before the actual generation that finishes the journey will exist. So the ship would have to last for 1000's of years and be able to processes resources gathered as they go like fuel, water, etc.... If there is life already on the planet who knows how advanced they will be by the time we get there. Will they want us? Long way to go on a blind date just to get rejected!!!!

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  16. Well we can"t get there from here. Did you stop and think that it belongs to someone else. They may not want us there. We need to fix our own broken planet.

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  17. Why dont we just breach into the microverse beneath us, maintain our normal size, move a couple inches forward, then back into our universe? Voila!! Just a thought?? We would have to apologize to the microverse though, might wipe out a few suns and such :( Speed through space = fail I believe, wouldn't time dialation make the journey a one way trip? Everyone here on earth would be long dead once you reached your destination... Until we figure out how to fold space, or make two identical parts of space through entanglement and perhaps gravity, traversing any large distance in space is only beneficial to those who take the journey. Guess i better start building that Ark... :)

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  18. Chiron? Chirooooon? Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri might be real?

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  19. lets go there and make it the same shit as here! :)

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  20. 1g aceleration for 20 days %10 Lightspeed .... with an lazer thruster we could send micro probes to there

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  21. While interesting, we must temper enthusiasm for future discoveries of the planet by recalling all the characteristics that the planet must meet to be a viable home for humanity or any other advanced life form. The book "Improbable Planet: How Earth Became Humanity's Home" covers these characteristics in detail:

    http://lukenixblog.blogspot.com/2017/04/book-review-improbable-planet-how-earth.html

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  22. It would take about 9 years to get there. That's not too bad. We could send a probe there without any problems

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